Research areas

Demographics

Human capital is becoming the key element for generating growth. What’s more, demographic trends have never been as important for determining the pace and type of change occurring around us.

Work and Value Creation

The process of generating value in the world economy is undergoing rapid changes. Understanding how to avoid the threats and harness opportunities linked to these transformations is key knowledge for any individual, company or state.

Global Innovations

Globalisation has accompanied humankind for all its history, but now it has achieved a critical mass, where the whole planet is as close as ever to be a single market. Globalisation is also intimately linked to the process of innovation, which thrives when markets are deeper and more horizontally integrated.

Energy

Energy, defined both as the fossil fuels we mainly use for transport and the calorie intake we need to keep us alive, is the key ingredient of a functioning global economy. Without sustainable energy use very long-term growth is impossible.

Demographics

Human capital is becoming the key element for generating growth. Furthermore, demographic trends, such as population ageing, falling birth rates, and changing patterns of co-habitation (more singles, less families) are affecting the supply of workers for companies.

The central issue of our times is the polarisation between many – mostly young – workers out of work and companies which can’t find specialists to fill their recruiting needs.

This subject area serves the needs of:

  • Entrepreneurs wishing to understand how to harness human capital for the success of their ventures
  • Companies planning their HR policies and struggling with finding talent
  • Policymakers designing education, demographic and migration initiatives at the local, national and international level

In this section we provide research on:

  • How human capital is accumulated and deployed for value creation
  • Best corporate practices of attracting, retaining and generating talent
  • New ways of shaping education to optimise human capital creation
  • The role of public authorities in assuring sustainable demographic development
  • Best practices of attracting skilled migrants at the national and local level

Work and Value Creation

The process of generating value in the world economy is undergoing rapid changes.

The old ways of sourcing and providing work, the role and distribution of value chains, the degrees of vertical and horizontal integration of firms are all changing. Cost and profit considerations are being re-examined.

This subject area serves the needs of:

  • Companies aiming to optimise the performance of their teams
  • Corporations managing value creation across geographies and on various levels
  • Multinationals managing and/or coordinating global value chains or products and services
  • Policymakers interested in optimising taxation, facilitation and attraction of new value creation

 In this section we provide research on:

  • The new ways in which workers and companies engage to create value
  • The key role of information as competitive advantage
  • The challenges and benefits of value creation spanning many jurisdictions and times zones
  • Tax competition for high-margin and highly-mobile value creation
  • How local and national governments can become platforms for facilitating high value-added activities in their jurisdictions

Global Innovations

The phenomenon of globalisation has been around for most of human history, but only recently has it reached critical mass as to become relevant – where it is truly creating one single planetary market.

However, the world is much less globalised than is commonly assumed and in some areas much more so than in others. Globalisation also varies greatly between countries. While its growing trend is caused by technological progress, there are many barriers hampering its advance. Globalisation is also intimately linked to the process of innovation, which thrives when markets are deeper and more horizontally connected.

This subject area serves the needs of:

  • Corporations whose core business depends on the increasing liberalisation of economic flows between countries
  • Companies based on highly-optimised international logistical operations
  • International organisations (both governmental and NGOs) operating in the international context
  • Policymakers charged with modernising and developing the economy of their respective countries/regions/cities
  • Innovative start-ups taking advantage of cross-country differences or bridging the international gap
  • Individuals whose work depends on global reach and mobility (thought leaders, top scholars, professional athletes, etc.)

In this section we provide research on:

  • The degree of capital, labour and knowledge flow liberalisation
  • Best practices in removing obstacles to international economic flows and introducing novel business models
  • How countries attract knowledge and human capital inflows and in time can move to developed-world status
  • How companies, charities, advocacy groups etc. internationalise their core activities and innovate in a global setting
  • Best practices for start-ups which build a business model based on international flows and differences
  • How individuals appeal to a global audience in championing a cause or building a career path

Energy

With the rapid development of large emerging markets such as China, India, and many others, global energy demand has skyrocketed. We define energy very broadly, both as the mainly fossil-fuel sources for transport and industrial activity, as well as the calorie intake required by bulging populations of increasing affluence.

The rise of large and previously poor countries is creating a strain on natural resources and the global climate. Furthermore, notwithstanding the negative effects of increased energy use, we are also faced with the problem of (theoretically) infinite economic growth in a closed planetary system.

This subject area serves the needs of:

  • Policymakers looking to improve the energy efficiency of their country/region/city
  • Local, national and international policymakers tackling the problem of climate change and sustainable development
  • Companies and countries faced with key natural resource shortages
  • Entrepreneurs offering new and innovative solutions to shortages and negative externalities of growth
  • Social entrepreneurs seeking solutions for problems such as energy, food, water shortages
  • Advocacy groups and campaigners for energy efficiency and sustainability
  • Stakeholders in countries affected by energy, sustainability or climate problems

In this section we provide research on:

  • Best practices for companies, regions and countries in increasing energy efficiency
  • Policies aimed at preventing and alleviating the effects of climate change and resource shortage
  • Local, national and international initiatives of efficient resource use
  • New technologies and solutions in food production
  • Economic and political incentives for energy efficiency, sustainability and resource pooling

 



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